From Homo sapiens to Techno sapiens

 Print

Thematic : Early life / Assisted reproduction

Studies

Published on : 04/05/2008

Author / Source : Margaret Somerville

Professor in the Faculty of Medicine
Founding Director of the Faculty of Law's Centre for Medicine,
Ethics and Law at McGill University

Children's Human Rights  to Natural Human Origin

Some old and new phenomena – adoption is old, new reproductive and genetic technologies and same-sex marriage are new – have recently thrown the issue of children's rights with respect to their biological origins and biological families into the public policy spotlight and public square debate.  

Adoption has long challenged children's rights with respect to their biological families. Early in the 20th century, societally condoned sperm donation presented a similar challenge. In the last thirty years new reproductive and genetic technologies (NRTs) have brought, and will continue to bring, unprecedented challenges. And, most recently same-sex marriage has done so. 

 

 From Homo sapiens to Techno sapiens: Children's Human Rights to Natural Human Origins”, Proceedings, 14th World Congress on In Vitro Fertilization & 3rd World Congress on In Vitro Maturation, Montreal, 15th – 19th September, 2007. 

  • genetics
  • embryo
  • NRT
  • origins
  • legislation

Similar articles

The Freezing, Implantation, and Adoption of Embryos

The Freezing, Implantation, and Adoption of Embryos

- Assisted reproduction

Is it acceptable to freeze human embryos?

We began freezing human embryos in order to augment the efficiency of the diverse methods of medically assisted reproduction. In this way we do not have to 'oblige' women to be subjected to repeated ovary sampling, either in the case where a first implantation is not successful or when a new fertilization is desired.

If we consider these embryonic cells as merely biological material or a potential embryo, freezing only poses technical or juridical...

Read more

Stud Bulls, Human Embryos

- Embryo research

Professor in the Faculty of Medicine
Founding Director of the Faculty of Law's Centre for Medicine,
Ethics and Law at McGill University

... and politically incorrect people: reflections on an ethical society

Recently, I answered the phone and a reporter, who often contacts me, exclaimed, "You won't believe what they've done now!" (they being the scientists). I said, "Oh my God, they've cloned a child and it's just been announced".
The reporter said, "No. No, they've cloned Starbuck",...

Read more

Biotechnology & the Human Spirit

- Assisted reproduction

Professor in the Faculty of Medicine
Founding Director of the Faculty of Law's Centre for Medicine,
Ethics and Law at McGill University

Facing the unprecedented challenge of reprogenetics

WHAT HAS CHANGED IN HUMAN REPRODUCTION?

Let's have a look, first, at the characteristics of human reproduction around fifty years ago:

Whether and when a child was conceived was largely a matter of chance (one could eliminate chance, of course, by not engaging in sexual intercourse, or reduce it by much...

Read more